Lil Dicky – Pillow Talking feat. Brain

By Rali Chorbadzhiyska Lil Dicky does not fail to entertain once again! His real name is David Burd and he rose to fame with his witty rap and hilarious videos, including Ex-boyfriend, White Dude and Lemme Freak. To know his life story why not have a go at his collaboration with Snoop Dogg - Professional Rapper. … Continue reading Lil Dicky – Pillow Talking feat. Brain

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‘Turn Off Your Brain and Just Trust Instinct’: Q-Tip on the Evolving Sound of Hip-Hop

For those of you who are into Hip-Hop (and longer reads)!

Longreads

A Tribe Called Quest’s sixth album, We got it from Here… Thank You 4 Your service, is a reminder of how much time has passed. As Noisey editor Kyle Kramer notes, it brings Phife Dawg’s voice back from the dead, uses familiar samples, and has that unmistakable Tribe groove. But the hip-hop group’s final studio album also marks now, and for many fans is very much relevant and political, especially given its release the day after the U.S. presidential election in 2016.

Kramer talks with Q-Tip about being egoless and instinctive — and staying true to himself and to Tribe while evolving with the sound of hip-hop.

I think you have to always look ahead, in anything. We sometimes become creatures of habit, and we want to continue to do things that we maybe have enjoyed or that strike a particular chord that we’ve experienced a long, long…

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Reflections on April Fool’s Day

By Rali Chorbadzhiyska London, Sofia, Athens - no one was safe from being tricked on April Fool's Day! Although not an official holiday, 1st of April has been an important date since the 19th century! Therefore, we've decided to share our favourite practical jokes by big companies done throughout the years! Google Google Chrome or Google Gnome?! … Continue reading Reflections on April Fool’s Day

The Topicality of Afro-Surrealism Today and Forever: A Critical Analysis of the ‘Afro-Surreal Manifesto’ by D. Scot Miller

  By Rali Chorbadzhiyska A few years after the coining of the term ‘Afro-Surrealism’ by Amiri Baraka in the 20th century, D. Scott Miller writes the movement’s manifesto in 2009.[1] Miller outlines the newness of Afro-Surrealism by also defending its engagement with past influences. He accounts for the politicising of the aesthetics with the prefix … Continue reading The Topicality of Afro-Surrealism Today and Forever: A Critical Analysis of the ‘Afro-Surreal Manifesto’ by D. Scot Miller